Dan Paluska


18 months of timelapse movies, and raising money for another 6 on the farm…

mirrors on brinno doodle
I carried a small timelapse camera that looks like a shampoo bottle around for a little more than 18 months. Each day became a ~3minute timelapse movie. About 300x normal speed. Five minutes of life becomes about 1 second of movie.
Each month is about 90 minutes of footage. I put together six months into a single film that has six panels laid out like this.
[ JUL AUG SEP
OCT NOV DEC ]
Here’s a sample from the first six month movie:

So I have now made 3 compilation movies. Each movie is about 90 minutes long and covers six months of my timelapse movies. From Mid 2009 to Jan 2011. To me, they are something like fishbowl or fireplace movies. A texture or pattern of life. Is there a narrative?

And here is timelapse version of the third episode compressed into 3 1/2 minutes.

All the individual movies and the compilation movies are public domain so you are free to reuse as you please.

But maybe you want a copy of the full lengths on DVD? I am happy to put them together for you with some custom art and mail it to you.

What did i take away from all these movies? I think mostly it made me think about plants and slowness. After all this time filming myself I figured it was time to spend some time filming something shared like our food supply so I am working with a couple small Boston area (Concord) farms to create a public domain movie about the 6 month growing season. Roughly late April to late September. $99 and you will get some timelapse movies, some handdrawn art and the bonus of helping fund a public domain movie about food.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1464315496/timelapse-farm-a-source-code-for-food

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do i need a narrative pyramid?
January 11, 2011, 9:07 pm
Filed under: art, feedback, information, narrative | Tags: , , ,

narrative, consumption doodle

all of these pieces of media i consume, they all have a story associated. a narrative. they contain information about how a series of events leads to a particular conclusion. depending on what type of stories i consume, then my mind is likely to interpret my own options and choices in the world differently.

for food, i can understand that i am what i eat. imw uti eat. imwutieet. when choosing what food to consume i might be guided by the food pyramid (or 40-30-30, local food, etc). basic carbohydrates at the bottom, fruit and veggies just above, meat and dairy after that and finally fats and oils. if i eat too much of the stuff at the top i will become unbalanced, unstable. a lopsided pyramid.

so what about the media i consume? how would i categorize or break down the different common narratives? what is the carbs? what is protein, fiber, fat? my first guess would be that hero narratives are fatty and i(and the rest of the west) have consumed a few too many of these. what should be the basic narrative, the bottom of the pyramid? something like “hard work pays off” or “clear goals and small steps”? or “just be”?

some of what i eat passes through me. some becomes fuel, some becomes muscle, bone, etc. what do the stories become? and how do i feel about my current diet?



broadcaster project and brooklynmobile
September 1, 2010, 11:56 pm
Filed under: advertising, art, feedback, information, opensource, plebiandesign

some recent movies for brooklyn mobile.

rocketboom nyc

new people productions

me

and see these videos and videobooths from a school in germany.

update:
a 14m compilation of Episode 4 of the brooklyners:

http://brooklynmobile.blip.tv has several longer compilations that make it easy to watch a bunch of videos in a row.



Record Keeping, Restaurants, and ‘Roids

Banks keep records of every transaction.
Courtrooms keep records of every case.
Sports games are all recorded and statistics published.
News live from the street.
Libraries, academic lectures, music bootlegs and live recordings, etc.
The carvings on an old desk keep some record of those who worked in that spot.

record keepin doodle, click for source code

So now we also keep records through mobile phone transactions, credit cards, twitter, youtube, version control systems, github, server log files, browser histories, and so much more. Are most of our recent records written from private spaces or private devices?

Courtrooms, sports games, on location news, and rock concerts are notable for their group witness to recording. We can trust media more if we have been part of the audience in a similar situation before?
And how about in our day to day lives, do we trust someone from far away with a mobile phone more than someone close without one?
It’s especially interesting in a dense city how many people you walk by each day and don’t talk to. Do you generally need some sort of third party technical reference to trust them? In a village you know (and trust?) your neighbors but in a city, you need a third party institution to regulate trust?

Is there a small service enterprise like a restaurant, barber shop, or bodega, but instead of serving you food or giving you a haircut, it delivers/collects info from you? And this would build trust and collaboration from bottom up as opposed to coming from the top down like current government or corporate trust systems? By putting collected info into the public domain, you are creating a lake instead of a warehouse full of inventory? And this would be a symmetric shared resource, more liquid than exoskeletal?

How would public record keeping change the dynamic between large product driven companies and small service businesses? Could a public history file for a small farm (local food) or a tailor(custom clothes) or any small service professional counteract the advertising dollars (tv, movies, billboards) of large corporate chains with packaged products?

And what do steroids have to do with any of this? What incentives do you create when you start keeping records? If certain transactions are worth big gains (like home runs), then how far will people go to ‘cheat’ the system in order to get that particular spot?
So if you want to avoid steroids and other abuses, what properties do you want your record keeping system to have?



show me the money

$2.89 pizza for breakfast

openbankdoodle

imagine you’re in a room with 20 people. maybe it’s your workplace, maybe it’s your church group, maybe it’s a holiday dinner or a classroom.

picture the group of people in your head, do you know how much each person is worth? now imagine everyone pulling out a balance sheet from their bag and putting it on the wall, side by side with all the rest. you and the rest mull around the walls and discuss?
how do you react to finding out that so-and-so is much richer or poorer than you expected? how does money change your opinion of the people you meet, be they new connections or old friends?

do you know groups of people who do something like this? would this increase collaboration? or minimize the rat race? how often do you comb your hair or check your clothes in the mirror?

i’m thinking a lot about my own practices with money and how i present my financial information to myself. i definitely pay my share of late fees, atm withdrawals, data overages, etc because i don’t have a good feedback loop for my own behavior. once a month is too infrequent and i don’t even do that.

i tried a picture for every purchase but it was the wrong type of publishing to actually effect my behavior and too much camera work. so i didn’t make it that far.

lately i’m thinking about some type of fridge door/wall calendar/corkboard exercise to place the info more in my physical and visual space. maybe some sort of timelapse whiteboard of my financial state… more on that to come. low tech, hi visibility, small batch, and reward based are some goals for whatever this turns out to be.

in the meantime, the year end signals to collect financial information and pay your duties to our governing systems. you know what they say when you get to the border, “where are you papers?”

anyways, here’s a look at the current state of things.

i’ll update this post with spreadsheets, etc as i get around to organizing the accounts and tallying. flickr set will contain the sources…



guggenheim fellowship application, tv2.0, twvee, public history file for physical space

tv 2.0, twvee, 2 way television doodle

i’m applying for the guggenheim fellowship. it’s due very soon and i’m way behind but the application will be focused around some implementation of the system shown in the tv2.0 doodle above. the doodle currently tells the story in a nicer way than my application but it should change a lot over the next couple days.

about the fellowship:
http://www.gf.org/about-the-foundation/the-fellowship/

The Foundation receives between 3,500 and 4,000 applications each year. Although no one who applies is guaranteed success in the competition, there is no prescreening: all applications are reviewed. Approximately 220 Fellowships are awarded each year.

and from the frequently asked questions:

The average amount of Fellowship grants in the 2008 United States and Canada competition was approximately $43,200. Since the purpose of the Guggenheim Fellowship program is to help provide Fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, grants are made freely. No special conditions attach to them…

the application resources:
http://www.gf.org/applicants/application-resources/

So, on to my application.
There are 3 main documents I am working on as google docs.

1. A brief narrative account of your career, describing your previous accomplishments. This account should include mention prizes, honors, and significant grants or fellowships that you have held or now hold, showing the grantor and the inclusive dates of each award.

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dcpfp46j_145cvg9tcfm I am focusing on my history and accomplishments through 3 directions: artist(music, sculpture, doodles, timelapse), systems engineer(mech eng, robotics, wikipedia/linux analysis), and community organizer(collision collective, radio show, etc). this is something i have thought about a decent amount but never tried to actually write down so it’s slow and needs some work.

2. A list of work:
Publications, if you are a scholar, scientist, or writer.
Give exact titles, names of publishers, and dates and places of publication.
Playwrights should also include a list of productions.
Exhibitions, if you are an artist.
Include a chronological list of shows, citing dates and places, and a list of collections in which your work is represented. Forthcoming shows should also be mentioned.

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dcpfp46j_1469gwzswcf

3. A statement of plans for the period for which the Fellowship is requested. Applicants in science or scholarship should provide a detailed, but concise, plan of research, not exceeding three pages in length. Applicants in the arts should submit a brief statement of plans in general terms, not exceeding three pages in length.

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dcpfp46j_147d62kv727 [UPDATE- i actually just turned in 3 doodles, this is actual pdf submission, http://www.scribd.com/doc/26286341/Paluska-Plans-for-guggenheim-fellowship ] My proposal for the project is focused on the ideas of the broadcaster project, twvee, tv 2.0, 2 way television, open systems engineering, open information channels, public history files through video, and distributed systems. Specifically, the proposal is to openly develop and implement an easily accessible public video booth for the Gowanus Public Housing project in Brooklyn, across the street from where I just moved, my local environment. Possibly this would be a short video version and a timelapse installation? The exact details should not be solidified, only the process, goals, and small steps. The exact form of the installation will be determined by working for a couple months with the local community.

see also the broadcaster project proposal to the banff/01sj/sundance locative cinema call. that is viewable here.

various doodles on the general idea of tv2.0, broadcaster project, local news 2.0, etc in this flickr set.

and notes on the broadcaster project.

television 2.o



if you hold still for 30 seconds, you can capture the moment.

(UPDATE – six month compilation 1, six month compilation 2)

from the five borough tour

the staten island ferry

i carry a timelapse camera with me everyday. when it is turned on, you just need to hold still for 30 seconds and the moment will be captured. i find this to be a powerful concept. one photo every 30 seconds gives you about a 2 minute video at the end of the day. (default playback rate on movies is closer to 5-10fps rather than 30fps.)

the above shot was a posed/planned. i placed it on the ground and we just milled around in that spot for 30 seconds and then moved on. you might not notice it in the context of the movie playing at full speed but it’s a nice frame. it’s from the following movie:

first let me try to summarize a few thoughts i have.
– document more with less opinion.
– more automatic and less filtered by my opinion of what is “worthwhile”
– sped up linear visual representation of how long things take is more useful than writing “5 hours” in a spreadsheet?
– one button simplicity
– in public it is a short conversation starter, sort of like having a pet.
– reflection on process and sharing
– less worry about documentation because it’s always happening anyways.
– don’t want to spend too much time on it but a minute or three each day seems worthwhile.

a little bit more about why timelapse in general:

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