Dan Paluska


show me the money

$2.89 pizza for breakfast

openbankdoodle

imagine you’re in a room with 20 people. maybe it’s your workplace, maybe it’s your church group, maybe it’s a holiday dinner or a classroom.

picture the group of people in your head, do you know how much each person is worth? now imagine everyone pulling out a balance sheet from their bag and putting it on the wall, side by side with all the rest. you and the rest mull around the walls and discuss?
how do you react to finding out that so-and-so is much richer or poorer than you expected? how does money change your opinion of the people you meet, be they new connections or old friends?

do you know groups of people who do something like this? would this increase collaboration? or minimize the rat race? how often do you comb your hair or check your clothes in the mirror?

i’m thinking a lot about my own practices with money and how i present my financial information to myself. i definitely pay my share of late fees, atm withdrawals, data overages, etc because i don’t have a good feedback loop for my own behavior. once a month is too infrequent and i don’t even do that.

i tried a picture for every purchase but it was the wrong type of publishing to actually effect my behavior and too much camera work. so i didn’t make it that far.

lately i’m thinking about some type of fridge door/wall calendar/corkboard exercise to place the info more in my physical and visual space. maybe some sort of timelapse whiteboard of my financial state… more on that to come. low tech, hi visibility, small batch, and reward based are some goals for whatever this turns out to be.

in the meantime, the year end signals to collect financial information and pay your duties to our governing systems. you know what they say when you get to the border, “where are you papers?”

anyways, here’s a look at the current state of things.

i’ll update this post with spreadsheets, etc as i get around to organizing the accounts and tallying. flickr set will contain the sources…

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if you hold still for 30 seconds, you can capture the moment.

(UPDATE – six month compilation 1, six month compilation 2)

from the five borough tour

the staten island ferry

i carry a timelapse camera with me everyday. when it is turned on, you just need to hold still for 30 seconds and the moment will be captured. i find this to be a powerful concept. one photo every 30 seconds gives you about a 2 minute video at the end of the day. (default playback rate on movies is closer to 5-10fps rather than 30fps.)

the above shot was a posed/planned. i placed it on the ground and we just milled around in that spot for 30 seconds and then moved on. you might not notice it in the context of the movie playing at full speed but it’s a nice frame. it’s from the following movie:

first let me try to summarize a few thoughts i have.
– document more with less opinion.
– more automatic and less filtered by my opinion of what is “worthwhile”
– sped up linear visual representation of how long things take is more useful than writing “5 hours” in a spreadsheet?
– one button simplicity
– in public it is a short conversation starter, sort of like having a pet.
– reflection on process and sharing
– less worry about documentation because it’s always happening anyways.
– don’t want to spend too much time on it but a minute or three each day seems worthwhile.

a little bit more about why timelapse in general:

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